A GIFT FOR YOU!

These ebooks – FREE – until March 10, 2018!

Click on the title below, to be taken to the book you want to read.

Dark Fire – Nothing is going to stop Lisa from visiting her beloved Jupiter, the horse she was forced to sell, neither her unsympathetic father nor the cruel nephew of Jupiter’s new owner. Then a crime is committed that shakes Lisa to her core, and the police suspect Jupiter.

Desert Song – When Sophie unwittingly puts her foster parents most valuable mare, Aria, in danger, she is afraid she will be sent away. So she keeps her mistake secret, hiding Aria in a remote canyon. But little does Sofie know that a terrible evil is drawing near.

Condor Mountain – Elena’s dad is trapped with his horse in the Andes mountains. Above them, the condors are circling, ready to strike. Elena is the only one who can get to her father and his horse in time, but she doesn’t believe they’re in danger – and she certainly doesn’t trust the strange girl who says she’ll help, the girl who rides the wild mare that no one has ever ben able to tame.

Swift Current – Ali realizes that all the accidents happening on the ranch aren’t really accidents. Someone is setting traps, trying to scare her. Then the intruder targets her horses. She can’t understand why anyone would want to hurt three innocent horses, but one thing’s for certain – she needs to figure it out before something terrible happens! Then the horses go missing. Is she already too late?

Gold Fever – On their annual horseback wilderness camping trip, Karlie and her dad run into a bit of unexpected trouble that quickly turns terrifying. Karlie’s dad is attacked by a murderer, then as he and Karlie escape, they are separated. Karlie knows she must find him and take him to a hospital. But she’s not the only one looking for him. The murderer is looking too, for her dad and for her.

Slave Child – Giselle is heartbroken when Madame says she is selling her old pony, Domi, for slaughter. The thought of gentle Domi being killed is too much. But things are worse than Giselle knows. Back at home, a restavec trader is waiting. Giselle’s aunt has just sold the orphans that were forced upon her – Giselle and her little brother. How can Giselle save Domi when she can’t even save herself?

Abandoned – A stranger is stalking Lauren, so her dad sends her to stay with his sister. What Lauren finds at her aunt’s house is both terrible beyond belief and more amazing than she can imagine! A time travel story!

Winter of the Crystal Dances – Evy can telepathically understand horses, a “gift” that enables her to rescue a mustang filly from certain death. Now can she let the filly she loves return to the wild?

Spring of the Poacher’s Moon – Evy and her horses rescue an orphaned moose calf, not realizing that the poachers who killed his mother will do anything to keep their activities a secret!

Summer of Wild Hearts – Evy is overjoyed that she is allowed to go to the rodeo, just like a normal kid. As she tries to help an abused mare, her filly, Twilight, is miles away and in danger.

Autumn in Snake Canyon – Tumpoo, the moose calf, is causing a world of trouble, but that’s not Evy’s big problem. She’s just discovered that her mom’s art dealer is stealing from them. How can she prove his crime?

Winter of Sinking Waters – Evy is looking forward to a fun weekend with her best friends, both horse and human, when they are rudely interrupted by a hungry bear who decides one of the cows will make a good meal.

Whether you download 1 or download 12, please ENJOY!

So Many Supers!

whisperI picked up Whisper, by Phoebe Kitanidis, from my daughter’s shelf. She is fifteen, so as you might guess, Whisper is a Young Adult novel. The story was entertaining, fast moving, had a nice mix of action and drama, plus family and friend relationships, and even a budding romance. My daughter loved it and I was entertained by it, so it was a win!

What I thought while reading: Like most YA novels these days (including some of my own books: the Whinnies on the Wind series, the Horse Guardian series, and more), Whisper featured a teen who has an extraordinary ability – and I couldn’t help but wonder yet again, why do such a high percentage of YA movies and books feature superhuman teens?

One can say that all demographics enjoy this genre, and that’s true – but the genres available to older readers are far more diverse. We have plenty of non-super protagonists to read about. In YA, the majority of novels include teens with an unusual ability of some sort.

My first thought: having super powers puts protagonists in previously unheard of situations, and therefore may create story interest out of novelty. But then I wonder, after a while wouldn’t reading about a non-super teen become new and fresh? Also, wouldn’t a “normal” character be more relatable?

Maybe the attraction to the super teen is an indicator of how some teens feel powerless in their lives. In the pages of a book, a reader usually feels as powerful as the protagonist, so that very well might be the draw. But do that many teenagers feel powerless? I hope not.

Another option: the super teen phenomena could simply be boredom with the world as it is. Yikes, and almost as sad as the feeling powerless theory. Especially since there is plenty to see in the world when one takes the time to really look.

Maybe it’s because teens are in the process of finding and realizing their own abilities, including those things they’re gifted at. In that case, reading about superhuman teens would be research. And as an aside, it is possible to have a super power. Here’s a list of 50 real-life superhumans.

Then I moved on to the other side of the computer, so to speak. Why do writers write about teens with super gifts?

I can’t speak for other writers of course, but I have tried to infuse my teens’ superpowers with a deeper message. In the case of Evy in the Whinnies on the Wind series, that truth was that we, as the dominant species, need to have compassion for all living creatures and treat them kindly. If, by reading my books, one person does something kind for an animal that they might not otherwise do, then Evy’s superpower has served its purpose.

In Whisper, it is possible that Phoebe Kitanidis also intended to show a deeper truth. Her protagonist’s superpower – to hear others’ thoughts as whispers – gave encouragement to the reader to be authentic to themselves.

Isn’t that something that we all want to hear – or dare I say even need to hear? I believe that on some level, we all know that honoring our most authentic self is how we reach our greatest potential. To me, to be personally authentic is a true super power – and I believe it is to young readers too.